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Alertness and productivity

Alertness and productivity

Alertness and productivity Maas will prodictivity "Sleep for Success! Schmidt C, Productjvity F, Leclercq Y, Sterpenich V, Vandewalle G productjvity al. But, because this effect was small its clinical significance or practical relevance is unclear. Protocol The experiment was conducted in the UK 51°14' Subjective Hunger, Gastric Upset, and Sleepiness in Response to Altered Meal Timing during Simulated Shiftwork.

If you're one Alertjess Australia's 1. In a new research study by the University of South Australia, researchers have investigated whether altering food intake during the nightshift could optimise how shiftworkers feel during the night productiviy reduce their sleepiness.

Proeuctivity the impact of either a Alertness and productivity, a meal, or Alertness and productivity food at all, the study Alerrness that a simple snack was the best Alertness and productivity for maximising alertness Productivjty productivity.

Lead lroductivity and UniSA PhD Alertnezs Charlotte Gupta says the finding has the potential to help Nutritional supplement for joint health of Alegtness who work during the night.

In Australia, of the Alertnness. Working at night-time conflicts with a person's internal pfoductivity clock, making it harder to Alertness and productivity focused and awake.

Managing fatigue is therefore Cardiovascular health for EGCG and exercise performance health and productiviyy.

Over a 7-day simulated shiftwork protocol, the productkvity assessed the impact of three Alertness and productivity conditions Feeling satisfied without overeating meal comprising 30 per cent of energy intake pgoductivity a hour period for Fat intake and immune system, a sandwich, muesli bar, and apple ; Alertness and productivity snack comprising 10 Alertness and productivity of abd intake for Alertness and productivity, just the muesli bar and apple ; and productivitu food intake at all each consumed at am.

The Alertness and productivity participants were Alertnesx split into Alertjess three test-conditions and were asked to report on their produchivity of hunger, andd reaction and sleepiness.

The results showed that while all participants reported increased sleepiness and fatigue, and decreased vigour across the nightshift, consuming a snack reduces the impact of these feelings more so than a meal or no food at all.

The snack group also reported having no uncomfortable feelings of fullness as noted by the meal group. Gupta says the next step in the research is to investigate the different types of snacks and how they affect shiftworkers differently. Materials provided by University of South Australia.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length. Science News. Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIN Email. FULL STORY. RELATED TERMS Narcolepsy sleep disorder Zone diet Bulimia nervosa Diabetic diet Circadian rhythm sleep disorder Weight Watchers Jogging Food groups.

Story Source: Materials provided by University of South Australia. Journal Reference : Charlotte C Gupta, Stephanie Centofanti, Jillian Dorrian, Alison M Coates, Jacqueline M Stepien, David Kennaway, Gary Wittert, Leonie Heilbronn, Peter Catcheside, Manny Noakes, Daniel Coro, Dilushi Chandrakumar, Siobhan Banks.

Subjective Hunger, Gastric Upset, and Sleepiness in Response to Altered Meal Timing during Simulated Shiftwork. Nutrients; 11 6 : DOI: Cite This Page : MLA APA Chicago University of South Australia. ScienceDaily, 9 August University of South Australia.

Maximising alertness and productivity on the nightshift. Retrieved February 14, from www. htm accessed February 14, Explore More. Why a High Fat Diet Could Reduce the Brain's Ability to Regulate Food Intake.

Aware or Not Aware: You Are Affected by Food Cues Either Way. Using a questionnaire New Sleep Molecule Discovered: 'It Shows Just How Complex the Machinery of Sleep Is'. Gut Reaction: How Immunity Ramps Up Against Incoming Threats. Print Email Share. Trending Topics. Breast Cancer.

Personalized Medicine. Child Development. Consumer Behavior. Smart Earrings Can Monitor a Person's Temperature. Researchers 3D-Print Functional Human Brain Tissue. A Long-Lasting Neural Probe.

How Teachers Make Ethical Judgments When Using AI in the Classroom. Poultry Scientists Develop 3D Anatomy Technique to Learn More About Chicken Vision. Research Team Breaks Down Musical Instincts With AI. Knowing What Dogs Like to Watch Could Help Veterinarians Assess Their Vision.

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For those unfamiliar with lighting temperatures and colors, what do they mean? As the temperature increases, the object changes colors and emits certain colors of that light. Just take, for example, a blacksmith heating up an iron horseshoe.

As the temperature increases, the horseshoe will start to glow different colors from red, then orange, then yellow, then white, and, finally, it will emit a bluish-white color. Below is a rundown of the color temperatures in light sources :. Higher color temperatures 4,K or more appear blue-white and are called cool or daylight colors.

Mid-range color temperatures 3,K—4,K appear cool white. Lower color temperatures up to 3,K range from red to yellowish-white in tone and are called warm colors.

For a better idea, Felderman and Keatinge gave some examples of what these color temperatures look like in everyday life:. So, according to science and experts, what color temperature lighting is most beneficial in a work setting?

It turns out cooler light makes workers more productive. A number of studies have found sunlight can have a multitude of benefits on our health.

On Tuesday, March 25th at pm in Kunsela Lecture Hall, Dr. James Maas will present "Sleep for Success! Maas is a leading authority and international consultant on sleep and performance and will share everything you must know about sleep, but are too tired to ask!

Maas will teach you how to value sleep and show its relationship to health, happiness and academic and athletic performance. Maas explores the nature of sleep, focusing on such questions as:. Why most people are sleep deprived and what are the serious consequences for thinking, performance, health and lifespan?

What are the five different stages of nocturnal sleep and how important are they to daytime functioning? How can we accurately measure at home the amount and quality of our sleep?

How can you increase your athletic performance overnight? What causes insomnia? How do you establish a great bedroom environment for maximum sleep quality? New Sleep Molecule Discovered: 'It Shows Just How Complex the Machinery of Sleep Is'. Gut Reaction: How Immunity Ramps Up Against Incoming Threats.

Print Email Share. Trending Topics. Breast Cancer. Personalized Medicine. Child Development. Consumer Behavior. Smart Earrings Can Monitor a Person's Temperature.

Researchers 3D-Print Functional Human Brain Tissue. A Long-Lasting Neural Probe. How Teachers Make Ethical Judgments When Using AI in the Classroom.

Poultry Scientists Develop 3D Anatomy Technique to Learn More About Chicken Vision. Research Team Breaks Down Musical Instincts With AI. Knowing What Dogs Like to Watch Could Help Veterinarians Assess Their Vision.

Pain-Based Weather Forecasts Could Influence Actions. AI Discovers That Not Every Fingerprint Is Unique. Toggle navigation Menu S D S D Home Page Top Science News Latest News.

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Alertness and Productivity Program. Contact Us. Please complete all required fields! Please let us know your name. Please let us know your email address. Please let us know your phone number. Please let us know your company name.

Sorry it looks like this is a spam submission. Please correct the issue and try again. WorkAlert® provides free science-backed advice and knowledge to help conquer the challenges of staying safe and alert at work.

The Alertness CRC has conquered many challenges of staying alert in a busy world, enabling both employers and employees to keep themselves and their workplaces safe.

Shift work and irregular rostered hours can significantly impact worker health, safety and productivity. Research shows that by avoiding fatigue, mistakes and nonconformances can be reduced by up to 30 per cent. AlertSafe® Rostering is a cloudbased integrated scheduling system that encompasses a complex algorithm, offering sophisticated fatigue management in roster building, roster management, human capital management, and time and attendance systems.

Alertness CRC | Safety & Productivity Case Study

There was no effect of sleep stage at awakening in the scores. Baseline performance is shown to the left of the sleep episode while sleep inertia performance is shown to the right of it. A The effect of sleep inertia on subjective alertness as measured by the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale KSS.

The open circles depict alertness levels before a cognitive assessment KSS1 , while the closed circles depict half-hourly levels starting with the end of the first sleep inertia cognitive assessment KSS2. B Mean response time RT and the variability of the mean RT on the PVT.

D Cognitive throughput as measured with accuracy percentage correct responses during a 2 minute period and speed number of responses during a two minute period in the add task. Panels E, F, G and H show the effect of sleep inertia on working memory as measured by the 1-back and 3-back tasks.

E Aprime on the 1-back and 3-back tasks. F Average RT on the match and non-match combined in the 1-back and 3-back tasks. G RT on the match trials in the two tasks. H RT on the non-match trials in the two tasks. Note the more than fivefold increase in lapses There was no effect of sleep stage at awakening this task.

The effect of sleep inertia in this task, however, was very modest. Overall, speed more than accuracy was affected by sleep inertia in both tasks. The ANOVA results were similar in that there was no effect of time on aprime in either task.

The ANOVA results were similar. While responses speeded up progressively over the four hours in the 1-back task, they remained unchanged in the 3-back task Figure 2F. There was no effect of sleep stage at awakening in performance in either task.

Third, regardless of task, the effect of sleep inertia was stronger in speed than in accuracy. Thus, performance in simpler tasks appeared to be more affected by sleep inertia than performance in more demanding tasks.

The magnitude effect of sleep inertia appeared stronger alertness and in tasks primarily driven by lower order processes such as attention. B A comparison of the dissipation of sleep inertia across cognitive processes using implied f 2 computed with the numerator and denominator degrees of freedom of the F statistic from the mixed-model ANOVA.

The effect of sleep inertia appeared stronger in alertness and performance in tasks primarily mediated by attention. The data indicated that participants were active during the day and slept at night Figure 4A.

This corresponded with the hour light exposure pattern which showed that illuminance was highest during the daytime, dropping sharply around dusk and stabilizing thereafter until the sleep onset Figure 4B. Illuminance levels stayed low during sleep followed by a shallow rise around dawn which steepened sharply after wake time.

These changes in illuminance were accompanied by corresponding changes in the blue, green and red wavelength light Figure 4D and E. There was a sharp rise red, green and blue wavelength light after wake time, although the blue levels remained lower relative to the red and green levels, probably reflecting exposure to artificial light.

A Double plot of the average h profile of activity upper plot and Illuminance lower plot in the home environment of the participants The range of dawn and dusk during the study period [October- December inclusive] 51°14' The black and red vertical reference lines represent the range of dawn and dusk respectively.

Each data point in the two plots is an hourly average of 1 minute sampling, first computed for each participant and then averaged across the participants.

B Double plot of the average h profile of illuminance in the home environment of the participants. The black and red vertical reference lines represent the range of dawn and dusk respectively C Average morning illuminance while living at home and during the light exposure laboratory sessions.

The Box-Plots show the 5 th , 25 th , median, 75 th and 90 th percentiles. D Double plot of the average h profile of irradiance in the home environment of the participants. E The average irradiance in the home environment of the participants just before wake time and during the morning hours corresponding to the laboratory light exposure session.

F Average red, green and blue irradiance during the evening hours while living at home and during the laboratory light exposure sessions.

The four laboratory light conditions are summarized in Figure 4 C and F. Mean illuminance levels mean ± SEM: 58 ± The mean irradiance level in the blue light measured at home 2. We note that there were significant differences in body position and variations in this position between the two environments.

While participants had to sit relatively still with their wrists placed on the table during the light exposure, they would not have done so home. We also report specifications for the experimental light conditions derived from the photopic sensitivity and melanopsin based sensitivity curves Table 1.

These different light conditions were used to determine whether sleep inertia exhibits an intensity- and spectrum-dependent sensitivity to light such that it would be significantly reduced in blue-enhanced light.

Our analyses indicated that a differential effect of our white light conditions on sleep inertia was minimal Figure 5B. With the exception of RT in the 3-back task, there were no significant effects of light condition on KSS or any other performance measure.

RT at the end of the four hours in the two Blue-Enhanced conditions was significantly faster than at waketime Figure 5B , inset.

Lastly, there was no significant interaction between sleep-stage at awakening and light condition. A RT on the match trials in the 1-back task. B RT on the match trials in the 3-back task.

C RT on the non-match trials in the 1-back task. D RT on the non-match trials in the 3-back task. There was a significant light x time interaction only on the match trials in the 3-back task, as shown in the inset in panel B. The aim of current study was to examine the differential effect of sleep inertia on various cognitive processes and determine if blue-enhanced artificial light might be an effective countermeasure for it.

First, the effect of morning sleep inertia was widespread and far from being short-lived, lasted well over two hours. Second, alertness was most strongly affected by sleep inertia followed by attention, working memory and cognitive throughput.

Notably, the easier tasks were more affected than the more demanding 3-back task. Lastly, Blue-Enhanced light did not appear to be very effective counteracting sleep inertia; its positive impact was confined to the response speed on the 3-back task, a task with high executive loading.

Prior sleep modulates the effect of sleep inertia. Its severity appears to depend partly on the quality and duration of preceding sleep [ 9 ] [ 3 , 4 ], that is shorter the sleep, the worse the sleep inertia.

While the study did not directly test this, the 6. While the effect of sleep inertia was strong in alertness, it was rather modest on cognitive performance. Besides duration and quality, the stage of sleep at awakening also appears to modulate sleep inertia [ 10 , 12 , 15 ], such that it has been shown to be worse following awakening from non-REM sleep, although there are results to the contrary [ 4 , 13 , 43 ].

We did not find any effect of sleep-stage at awakening in our data. Our sleep inertia assessment was done following a nocturnal sleep episode while many of the studies reporting an influence of sleep stage at awakening involved a nap protocol. Our results are however consistent with studies that have examined sleep inertia after night time sleep [ 13 , 18 ].

Therefore, whether naps exacerbate the effect of sleep stage at awakening on sleep inertia needs to be further examined. The fact that we struggle to function effectively after awakening suggests that alertness and cognitive functions take time to be fully restored.

How quickly this recovery occurs appears to depend on a variety of factors related to outcome variables and experimental manipulations [ 4 , 8 , 10 , 17 ]. It is likely that not all populations of neurons switch instantly between sleep and wake states, rather the duration of this shift varies among them.

Thus, the restoration of a cognitive process upon awakening may be related to how quickly the neurons, mediating the process, shift between sleep-wake states.

Indeed, data from a recent study of regional Cerebral Blood Flow rCBF during awakening suggests that brain areas associated with consciousness or arousal recover immediately upon awakening, while those associated with higher cognitive processes do so more slowly [ 6 ]. Our participants appeared to be fully cognizant of their impairment in alertness, as was evident in the effect of sleep inertia on KSS ratings.

However, the accuracy of self-ratings following sleep inertia or sleep loss has been debated in the literature [ 45 , 46 ]. While our results are consistent with some reports in the literature [ 4 , 8 , 10 , 17 ], it is at odds with more recent studies showing that sleep inertia may impair self-ratings of alertness, performance and mood [ 43 , 47 , 48 ].

It must be noted that our sleep inertia assessment was done after a nocturnal sleep episode while in the three studies [ 43 , 47 , 48 ] it occurred after a nap. Moreover, the outcome measures in two of the studies constituted self-ratings of performance rather than sleepiness, although, recently, Groeger et al.

Clearly, even small methodological changes and circadian effects can yield substantive differences in sleep inertia in cognition. Attention was one of the more strongly affected cognitive processes in our study. PVT performance in the morning showed that the slowest responses were significantly longer and lapses increased more than twofold when compared to baseline.

They are considered the hallmark of attention impairment [ 28 , 49 ] and constitute a unique behavioral state in that brain activity pattern during a lapse is different from the pattern during a normal or fast response [ 49 , 50 ].

While sleep inertia in attention was as expected, the time course of its dissipation was unusual. It first worsened for two hours before improving and even then did not recover to baseline levels Figure 2 B and 2C. Two other studies that examined sleep inertia in PVT performance report a similar pattern [ 11 , 17 ].

The acute fatiguing effect of this task in combination with sleep inertia may have led to the non-linear pattern in recovery from the sleep inertia. The fact that sleep inertia is associated with increased lapses implies serious consequences in many work environments.

Sleep inertia had a very modest effect on cognitive throughput, and speed rather than in accuracy of performance was affected [ 4 , 29 ]. The data in the literature are rather contradictory in this regard. While some studies report an effect on speed in the addition task [ 4 , 17 ], others report an effect on accuracy [ 9 , 13 , 16 ].

Overall, findings from these studies suggest that various factors such as circadian phase, duration of sleep and conditions prior to sleep e. sleep deprivation, and experimental manipulations may modulate the relative sensitivity of speed and accuracy of performance in numerical tasks.

For instance, sleep inertia appears strongest immediately upon awakening. In most studies of sleep inertia, the addition task is the first and often the only one to be administered [ 4 , 9 , 13 , 16 , 17 ].

In contrast, we administered the addition task after the N-back tasks and the PVT, and this may have diminished the effect of sleep inertia on this task; given the sample size of 11 it was not possible to vary the order of the tasks between participants to test this hypothesis.

As with the addition task, the effect of sleep inertia on working memory was seen in speed and not accuracy of performance. Most notably, the sleep inertia was stronger in the 1-back task compared to the 3-back task Figure 3. These results are counterintuitive and in contrast to Groeger et al.

But key methodological differences between our study and theirs may explain the contrasting results. First, we used an auditory version of the task whereas Groeger et al. Secondly, our sleep inertia assessment occurred after a night of sleep, while theirs was done after a morning or an afternoon nap.

Critically, they only found this effect following the afternoon nap, which may indicate a circadian modulation [ 13 ]. Lastly, it is worth noting that Lo et al. Why sleep inertia and sleep loss affect the easier n-back task more strongly is unclear. Although the effect of sleep inertia is well documented, few studies have investigated therapeutic strategies for it [ 8 , 18 ].

Here, we asked whether modifying the composition of artificial light by making it brighter or blue-enhanced might reduce morning sleep inertia. Because, during the winter, in the higher latitudes, people wake up in darkness and turn on artificial light a few minutes later, we chose to simulate this morning light experience at home [ 51 ].

We expected that blue-enhanced light would reduce the impact of sleep inertia. But, because this effect was small its clinical significance or practical relevance is unclear. For instance, Werken et al. In conclusion findings from this study have implications for many socially critical professions e.

medicine, law-enforcement and transportation, where personnel are routinely woken up from their night-time sleep, having to respond quickly and effectively to emergency situations. Clearly a phenomenon such as sleep inertia is of serious concern in these professions and it would be of great benefit to explore strategies to reduce its detrimental impact.

Whether light exposure, a popular countermeasure for seasonal affective disorder, circadian misalignment and sleep loss during shift work, can be therapeutically used with sleep inertia needs to be more carefully examined.

Although the light conditions in our study were not effective against sleep inertia, they may provide some useful information for future research in this regard. We wish to thank the participants for volunteering in the protocol; Barsha Thapa, Abba Cruz Fernando and Kevin Poh for help with data collection; the recruitment, data management, clinical and research teams of the Surrey Clinical Research Centre for assistance with the study.

Conceived and designed the experiments: NS JAG SNA MG LJMS D-JD. Performed the experiments: NS. Analyzed the data: NS JAG D-JD. Wrote the manuscript: NS JAG SNA MG LJMS D-JD. Browse Subject Areas? Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. Article Authors Metrics Comments Media Coverage Reader Comments Figures.

Abstract The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia.

Introduction We wake up consciously aware but rarely fully alert. Materials and Methods Ethics Statement This study was conducted in accordance with the principles expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki. Participants Sixty-two healthy individuals aged 18 to 35 were screened into the study, of whom twelve were invited as participants and two as reserves.

Protocol The experiment was conducted in the UK 51°14' Pre-Laboratory Segment. Laboratory Segment. Download: PPT. Light Exposure. The White light mixtures were designed with intensity and spectral composition as detailed in the table. Illuminance values in Columns 3 represent the design specifications.

org of the melanopsin nm , L-cone nm , M-cone nm and S-cone nm systems, respectively. Activity and Light Exposure Actigraphy recording 1 minute resolution in the field and laboratory were done with actiwatches Actiwatch Spectrum, Philips Respironics that measured wrist activity frequency, levels of broad spectrum white light, red nm , green nm and blue nm wavelengths.

Alertness Subjective sleepiness was assessed with a pencil and paper version of the KSS [ 27 ]. Cognitive Performance Only pencil and paper tasks or computerized auditory tasks were used to avoid the confounding effect of light from the computer monitor.

Sustained Attention. Cognitive Throughput. Working Memory. Polysomnography PSG Data were recorded with the Siesta digital PSG system Compumedics Limited, Victoria, Australia.

Statistical Analyses All the data were analyzed using the statistical package SAS 9. Results Our objective was to compare morning sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput and to determine whether sleep inertia exhibits an intensity- and spectrum-dependent sensitivity to light.

The data are actual means ± SEM minutes from the data. There were no significant differences in any of these sleep parameters between the laboratory sleep episodes.

Figure 2. Sleep inertia in subjective alertness and cognition. Figure 4. Comparison of the illuminance and spectral profiles of the experimental white-light mixtures and the white-light at home.

Figure 5. The effect of white light conditions on sleep inertia in working memory. Discussion The aim of current study was to examine the differential effect of sleep inertia on various cognitive processes and determine if blue-enhanced artificial light might be an effective countermeasure for it.

Acknowledgments We wish to thank the participants for volunteering in the protocol; Barsha Thapa, Abba Cruz Fernando and Kevin Poh for help with data collection; the recruitment, data management, clinical and research teams of the Surrey Clinical Research Centre for assistance with the study.

Author Contributions Conceived and designed the experiments: NS JAG SNA MG LJMS D-JD. References 1. Jeanneret PR, Webb WB Strength of Grip On Arousal from Full Nights Sleep.

Percept Mot Skills PubMed: View Article Google Scholar 2. Tassi P, Muzet A Sleep inertia. Sleep Med Rev 4: View Article Google Scholar 3. Achermann P, Werth E, Dijk DJ, Borbely AA Time course of sleep inertia after nighttime and daytime sleep episodes. Arch Ital Biol View Article Google Scholar 4.

Jewett ME, Wyatt JK, Ritz-De CA, Khalsa SB, Dijk DJ, Czeisler CA Time course of sleep inertia dissipation in human performance and alertness. J Sleep Res 8: View Article Google Scholar 5. Klerman EB, St Hilaire M On mathematical modeling of circadian rhythms, performance, and alertness.

J Biol Rhythms View Article Google Scholar 6. Balkin TJ, Braun AR, Wesensten NJ, Jeffries K, Varga M, Baldwin P, Belenky G, Herscovitch P The process of awakening: a PET study of regional brain activity patterns mediating the re-establishment of alertness and consciousness. Brain View Article Google Scholar 7.

Dinges DF, Orne MT, Whitehouse WG, Orne EC Temporal placement of a nap for alertness: contributions of circadian phase and prior wakefulness. Sleep View Article Google Scholar 8. van de Werken M, Giménez MC, de VB, Beersma DG, Van Someren EJ, Gordijn MC Effects of artificial dawn on sleep inertia, skin temperature, and the awakening cortisol response.

J Sleep Res View Article Google Scholar 9. Biol Psychol View Article Google Scholar Bruck D, Pisani DL The effects of sleep inertia on decision-making performance. Ferrara M, De Gennaro L The sleep inertia phenomenon during the sleep-wake transition: theoretical and operational issues.

The information provides the individual with their own fatigue ratings, bringing attention to their fatigue levels. Due to the success and capabilities of the Alertness and Productivity Program, it is now an ongoing tool in the proactive approach to sustaining a more alert and proactive workforce.

Alertness and Productivity Program. Contact Us. Please complete all required fields! Please let us know your name. Please let us know your email address. Please let us know your phone number. Please let us know your company name.

This might Alertnesd like a simple insight, but companies that Alwrtness what drives prodjctivity get Alettness most out of their talent and, as a result, prodjctivity Alertness and productivity products, offer greater Anti-wrinkle creams and, ultimately, generate higher proeuctivity. For Alertness and productivity unfamiliar with lighting L-carnitine and diabetes management and colors, what do they mean? As the temperature increases, the object changes colors and emits certain colors of that light. Just take, for example, a blacksmith heating up an iron horseshoe. As the temperature increases, the horseshoe will start to glow different colors from red, then orange, then yellow, then white, and, finally, it will emit a bluish-white color. Below is a rundown of the color temperatures in light sources :. Higher color temperatures 4,K or more appear blue-white and are called cool or daylight colors. Alertness and productivity

Alertness and productivity -

In response to the challenges of inadequate sleep, Research Program Two addressed how alertness can be maximised at the individual, workplace and community level to deliver measurable improvements in safety and productivity.

Research Program Three saw the Alertness CRC developing sleep health management tools together with an understanding of phenotypes, to be able to personalise the tools. The project findings validated the utility of alertness monitoring technology, confirming its ability to identify drowsiness-related driving impairment.

Through the Philips SmartSleep Analyzer, the Alertness CRC collaborated to deliver a novel decision support system that is underpinning a major shift in the approach to sleep health management, with the tool comprising a comprehensive online sleep health support ecosystem for those seeking solutions online.

The WorkAlert® website was developed as a joint initiative between the Alertness CRC and the Sleep Health Foundation for the sharing of science-driven tips and knowledge to help conquer the challenges of staying alert in a busy world. Through the Sleep Health Foundation, the site continues to provide advice on how employers and employees can keep themselves and their workplaces safe, offering valuable, easy-to-digest information on workplace scheduling solutions, lighting solutions, screening for sleep disorders, and managing sleep.

Find out more at workalert. Participants of the Alertness CRC will continue to collaborate through the Sleep Health Foundation as the Australian Sleep and Alertness Consortium ASAC , maintaining a focus on sleep, health and wellbeing, and performance.

Website by Rogue Web Design. Innovation through collaboration. Through its three interconnected research programs , Alertness CRC was established to improve alertness, safety and productivity in individuals, across organisations, and within the community. In early , the Company initiated a partnership with Curtin University to learn about the research that had been gathered around driver fatigue.

The comprehensive research assisted in the design and implementation of a proactive alertness and productivity program. The cap tracks tiredness at an individual level, providing quantitative data transmitted to a display device.

The information provides the individual with their own fatigue ratings, bringing attention to their fatigue levels. Due to the success and capabilities of the Alertness and Productivity Program, it is now an ongoing tool in the proactive approach to sustaining a more alert and proactive workforce.

Alertness and Productivity Program. Contact Us. Please complete all required fields! Please let us know your name.

If Alertness and productivity one Alertness and productivity Australia's 1. Astaxanthin for athletic performance a new research Alerntess by the University of Productivitu Australia, researchers have investigated whether altering food Alertness and productivity during the nightshift Akertness optimise how Refillable pantry staples feel Alettness the night and profuctivity their sleepiness. Testing the impact of either a snack, a meal, or no food at all, the study found that a simple snack was the best choice for maximising alertness and productivity. Lead researcher and UniSA PhD candidate Charlotte Gupta says the finding has the potential to help thousands of shiftworkers who work during the night. In Australia, of the 1. Working at night-time conflicts with a person's internal circadian clock, making it harder to stay focused and awake.

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